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2014 November 1st Georgia Snow

Data from the Atlanta NWS office First Snow of the Season in Georgia! Early on November 1, 2014, northeast Georgia received their first snow of the season! A strong upper level low dove into eastern Georgia and the Carolinas, bringing wrap-around moisture from the low pressure system to parts of Georgia. In addition, the area was in northwest flow with cold air being ushered into the state. This combination of precipitation and freezing temperatures brought the first snow of the season to Georgia. Even though the accumulation was limited to the northeastern part of the state, snow flurries were observed as far south as the northern portion of the Atlanta metro area! Overall snowfall accumulations ranged from 0.5-2 inches. This snow event was unusually early for the season. Although snowfall records across northeast Georgia are somewhat limited, based on records that are available, the previous earliest snowfall at Blairsville was November 10 (1968), at Helen it was November 12 (1968) and at Cleveland it was also November 12 (1968). Please note there is the potential for missing data at these sites. 500mb Pattern on November 1, 2014 5am Temperatures on November 1, 2014   Snowfall Map from November 1, 2014

NorthGeorgiaWX

NorthGeorgiaWX

2017 December 8-9 Heavy Snow

All data from the Atlanta NWS office Heavy Snowfall December 8 - 9, 2017   Event Summary Snow Accumulation Map Recorded Snowfall Totals Event Photos   Event Summary A major early-season heavy snowfall affected north Georgia from Friday, December 8th into the morning of Saturday, December 9th. Many locations recorded up to a foot of snowfall, which is exceptionally rare for Georgia, especially in early December! This heavy snowfall also led to numerous power outages. At the height of the storm over 200,000 customers in north Georgia were in the dark. There was a sharp northwest to southeast gradient of accumulating snow through metro Atlanta. Areas southeast of Atlanta did not receive much accumulating snow, while areas north and west of the city received very significant totals.   Snow Accumulation Map: Above: The heaviest snow accumulations occurred in a ribbon stretching from Carroll County into the northwestern Atlanta suburbs and into the north Georgia mountains. Up to a foot of snow accumulated in these areas!   Satellite Image December 9th: Above: A visible satellite image of north Georgia on the afternoon of Saturday, December 9th shows much of the snow that fell on Friday and early Saturday remained on the ground.   Snowfall Reports Table   For snowfall reports from a specific county, click on the county name of interest below. Counties are sorted alphabetically. (*Note that only counties from which reports were received are listed below.*)   Banks Dawson Hall Polk Barrow DeKalb Haralson Towns Bartow Douglas Henry Troup Carroll Fannin Jackson Union Catoosa Fayette Lumpkin Walker Chattooga Floyd Madison Walton Cherokee Forsyth Murray White Clayton Fulton Muscogee Whitfield Cobb Gilmer Paulding   Coweta Gwinnett Pickens   Event Photos Over 10" of snow accumulated in the Brookstone Subdivision in Acworth. (courtesy of Chris Dolce) Acworth, GA About 13" of snow was recorded in Jasper. (courtesy of Dean Davis) Jasper, GA  Trees drooped and broke under the weight of a foot of heavy, wet snow in Hiram. (courtesy of Brandie Freeman)  Hiram, GA About 8" of snow fell at this location along the Cobb/Fulton County border in Roswell. (courtesy @d_mez7) Roswell, GA The Carroll County Courthouse is covered in several inches of snow. (courtesy of Carroll County Gov't) Carrollton, GA Snow falling in Midtown Atlanta on December 8, 2017. (courtesy of Jeremy Mills) Atlanta, GA Several inches of snow accumulated along the Atlanta BeltLine in Inman Park. (courtesy of Atlanta BeltLine) Atlanta, GA This aerial view of a Fayette County neighborhood shows a blanket of snow on the morning of December 9th. (courtesy @supeshooter) Fayette County, GA The Union County Historical Courthouse on the morning of December 9th. Blairsville, GA The heavy snow caused extensive damage to power infrastructure. (Courtesy of Cobb EMC) Powder Springs, GA This aerial view of Georgia Tech and Midtown Atlanta shows the abundant snow cover. (Courtesy of Zonglin Jack Li) Atlanta, GA Berry College was picturesque in the snow. (Courtesy of Berry College) Rome, GA  

NorthGeorgiaWX

NorthGeorgiaWX

Hurricane Michael

All data from the Atlanta NWS office Hurricane Michael Hits Georgia  October 10, 2018 [Overview] [Damaging Wind] [Wind Damage Photos] [Heavy Rainfall] [Tornadoes]   Overview: Hurricane Michael made landfall along the Florida panhandle near Panama City on the afternoon of October 10, 2018 as a high-end Category 4 hurricane. Michael then moved rapidly inland, causing widespread wind damage along its path. Hurricane Michael was the strongest hurricane on record to make landfall along the Florida panhandle as well as the first major hurricane (Category 3+) to directly impact Georgia since the 1890s. In southwest Georgia, wind gusts as high as 115 mph were recorded in Donalsonville. Within the NWS Atlanta/Peachtree City county warning area, winds gusted over 70 mph in portions of central Georgia on the evening of October 10th, leading to widespread tree damage and power outages as well as severe crop damage, especially to cotton and pecan crops. Additionally, a few brief tornadoes in the outer bands of Michael caused sporadic damage in portions of the the area while heavy rainfall led to localized flooding. Michael quickly exited the state as a tropical storm on the morning of October 11th. For more information on the catastrophic damage experienced within the NWS Tallahassee area, click here. This infrared satellite image was taken as Hurricane Michael entered southwest Georgia as it maintained a Category 3 intensity on the evening of October 10, 2018.  (Click the map to enlarge it.)   Damaging Winds: Within the portion of central Georgia in the NWS Atlanta/Peachtree City county warning area, sustained winds of 40-50 mph with gusts in the 60-75+ mph range downed countless trees and power lines. Numerous trees fell onto homes and businesses, causing additional damage. The peak wind gust officially recorded within the local warning area was in Arabi, GA where a 76 mph gust was recorded. Even stronger wind gusts well over hurricane force (74+ mph) were recorded in southwest Georgia in the NWS Tallahassee county warning area. Power outages lasted up to a week or even a bit longer for some areas. Below is a map displaying many of the strong wind gusts recorded across the state during Hurricane Michael.  Note: Wind gusts were likely stronger than displayed for a number of locations in central and south Georgia; however, recording instruments failed as electrical power and communications were lost. This map displays peak recorded wind gusts across Georgia during Michael. (Click the map to enlarge it.)   This graph shows wind direction and wind speed/gusts in miles per hour in Eastman, GA. (Courtesy MesoWest, University of Utah) Gusts exceeded 60 mph before the instrument ceased reporting. Click the graph to enlarge it.   This graph shows wind direction and wind speed/gusts in miles per hour in Dublin, GA. (Courtesy MesoWest, University of Utah) Wind gusts exceeded 60 mph before the instrument ceased reporting. Click the graph to enlarge it.   This graph shows wind direction and wind speed/gusts in miles per hour in Cordele, GA. (Courtesy MesoWest, University of Utah) Wind gusts exceeded 50 mph before the instrument ceased reporting. Click the graph to enlarge it.
Wind Damage Photos: Widespread tree damage of this magnitude occurred in Cordele. Many homes were damaged by falling trees. Electrical infrastructure experienced significant damage in many areas of central Georgia. (Cordele, GA)   Many large trees like this one were downed in Dodge County. (Courtesy WGXA-TV) Numerous trees and power lines were brought down in Americus. (Courtesy Americus Times-Recorder)   Trees were downed around this house on Judy Lane in Americus. (Courtesy Americus Times-Recorder)


Heavy Rainfall: Rainfall totals reached in excess of 5" in some locations. Though the ground was relatively dry due to recent dry weather, these rainfall totals led to isolated instances of flooding, including a few roads that were washed out.      This road near Dallas in Paulding County experienced a washout due to the heavy rainfall from Michael. (Courtesy: Paulding County Fire Department)
Tornadoes: Three brief tornadoes touched down in the outer bands of Hurricane Michael on the evening of October 10th. See the specifics on these tornadoes below.   1) Peach County Tornado: A brief EF-0 tornado snapped a few pine trees along Carver Drive, just south of Fort Valley State University. Damage Path - Peach County County Rating # of Injuries KML Peach EF-0 0    Rating: EF-0 Peak Wind: 75 MPH Path Length: 1.8 miles Path Width: 100 yards Fatalities: 0 Injuries: 0 Start Date: October 10, 2018 Start Time: 3:32 PM EDT Start Lat/Lon: 32.4955 / -83.8795 End Date: October 10, 2018 End Time: 3:36 PM EDT End Lat/Lon: 32.5195 / -83.8916     2) Crawford County Tornado: Hurricane Michael spawned a high-end EF-1 tornado in Crawford County within its outer rain bands. The tornado first touched down along Avera Road southwest of Roberta, snapping a few small trees and branches near a residence just east of the Hammett Road intersection. The tornado continued west-northwest, crossing Pope Road and Carroll Road, snapping and uprooting trees with the high-end EF-0 range. The tornado continued to move west where it intensified to a high end EF-1 with estimated maximum winds of 110 mph along Flint River Estates Road. Numerous trees were snapped from 10 to 20 feet off the ground or uprooted, including many hardwood trees. Several homes along the road were damaged by falling trees. A detached workshop at one of the homes was completely destroyed. The survey revealed that the garage was open with the opening facing the direction of the maximum winds, which led to its complete failure. The tornado continued westward, snapping trees as it crossed State Route 128 where it damaged another residence with falling trees. The tornado continued west, crossing Hortman Road, where a few small trees and large branches were downed before lifting as it approached Walker Chapel Road. Damage Path - Crawford County County Rating # of Injuries KML Crawford EF-1 0    Rating: EF-1 Peak Wind: 110 MPH Path Length: 5.0 miles Path Width: 250 yards Fatalities: 0 Injuries: 0 Start Date: October 10, 2018 Start Time: 3:58 PM EDT Start Lat/Lon: 32.6525 / -84.0267 End Date: October 10, 2018 End Time: 4:07 PM EDT End Lat/Lon: 32.6937 / -84.0974   Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted along the tornado track. This outbuilding was destroyed by the tornado. 3) Fulton County (Atlanta) Tornado: A brief tropical-cyclone tornado touched down just a couple miles southwest of downtown Atlanta along Dill Avenue SW. Along this road, several large trees were snapped. This is where a Tornado Debris Signature (TDS) was initially observed and where a peak wind of 75-80 mph was estimated. The tornado quickly crossed Highway 29 (Lee Street SW), downing several more trees along Avon Avenue SW between Princess Avenue SW and Wyland Drive SW. No further notable damage was seen downstream from this point. Damage Path - Fulton County County Rating # of Injuries KML Fulton EF-0 0    Rating: EF-0 Peak Wind: 80 MPH Path Length: 1.1 miles Path Width: 100 yards Fatalities: 0 Injuries: 0 Start Date: October 10, 2018 Start Time: 6:33 PM EDT Start Lat/Lon: 33.7179 / -84.4126 End Date: October 10, 2018 End Time: 6:37 PM EDT End Lat/Lon: 33.7236 / -84.4312   This large tree was downed by the tornado. This was one of several trees uprooted by the tornado.  

NorthGeorgiaWX

NorthGeorgiaWX

2018 October Climate in Georgia

All data is from the National Weather Service in Atlanta North and Central Georgia October 2018 Climate Summary (Majority of locations were 3 to 4 degrees warmer than normal and ~1 inch wetter than normal) Monthly Top 10 Rankings: Athens 10th warmest on record Atlanta 6th warmest on record Macon 10th warmest on record *Complete rankings in tables below   Hurricane Michael Hurricane Michael entered Georgia on 10/10 – 10/11 bringing 50 to 76+ mph wind gusts to portions of central GA. Listed below are a few of the highest measured gusts in our area. A map of the highest gusts across the state has also been included below. For more information on Hurricane Michael and the impacts in Georgia click here.  Site  Highest Gusts (mph)   Arabi – Crisp County 76  Cordele – Crisp County 69  Eastman – Dodge County 63  Hatley – Crisp County 63  Dublin – Laurens County 61  Louisville – Jefferson County  60  McRae – Telfair County 59  Unadilla – Dooly County 58  Byromville – Dooly County 58 *Note: Data gathered from multiple sources including (ASOS/AWOS/GDOT/USFS/AEMN). Data slightly incomplete due to the failure of some observing sites.   Temp. Extremes (°F) for October  Site Warmest Temp. Coldest Temp.  Athens 95 (10/5) 37 (10/22)  Atlanta 93 (10/6) 43 (10/21)  Columbus 92 (10/5,10/6)  44 (10/22,10/28)   Macon 95 (10/5) 36 (10/22)  Cartersville 92 (10/5)* 32 (10/22)*  DeKalb Peachtree Arpt  92 (10/5)* 37 (10/22)  Fulton Co. Arpt 91 (10/5*,10/6*) 36 (10/22)*  Gainesville 90 (10/5)* 40 (10/22)*  Peachtree City  92 (10/5*,10/6*)  35 (10/22)  Rome 93 (10/5,10/6*) 35 (10/22) * Set record for day October Averge Temperature (°F) and Rankings * Click on site name below to view a graph with additional data Site  Avg. Temp and Current Ranking   Normal   Dep. from Normal  Record Athens 66.3 (10th Warmest) 63.0 +3.3 73.0 (1919) Atlanta 67.4 (6th Warmest) 63.3 +4.1 70.8 (1919) Columbus 70.3 (11th Warmest) 66.5 +3.8 77.5 (1919) Macon 68.9 (10th Warmest) 64.9 +4.0  74.4 (1919)  Cartersville 64.2 60.6 +3.6    DeKalb Peachtree Arp t 65.7 61.9 +3.8   Fulton Co. Arpt 65.5 62.5 +3.0   Gainesville 64.8 61.7 +3.1   Peachtree City 66.3 61.4 +4.9   Rome 65.6 61.1 +4.5     Precipitation Extremes (in) for October Site   Highest Daily Amount   Athens 1.87" (10/11) Atlanta 3.42" (10/10)* Columbus 3.26" (10/10)* Macon 3.22" (10/10)* Cartersville 2.90" (10/10)*  DeKalb Peachtree Arpt   2.12" (10/10)* Fulton Co. Arpt 4.34" (10/10)* Gainesville 2.29" (10/10)* Peachtree City 3.09" (10/10)* Rome 1.02" (10/10) * Set record for day October Precipitation Totals (in) and Rankings * Click on site name below to view a graph with additional data Site  Total Precip and Current Ranking   Normal   Dep. from Normal  Records Athens 4.26" (39th Wettest) 3.55" +0.71"  11.23" (1937)  Atlanta 4.75" (27th Wettest) 3.41" +1.34" 11.04" (1995) Columbus 4.14" (28th Wettest) 2.58" +1.56" 8.41" (1995) Macon 4.62" (19th Wettest) 2.79" +1.83" 9.39" (1959) Cartersville 4.80" 3.40" +1.40"    DeKalb Peachtree Arpt  3.99" 3.45" +0.54"   Fulton Co. Arpt 7.19" 3.61" +3.58"   Gainesville 4.56" 4.08" +0.48"   Peachtree City 4.79" 3.41" +1.38"   Rome 3.60" 3.86" -0.26"     Records Set this October Athens: High Minimum Temperature - 71 on 10/10 (ties record of 71 in 2017) - 66 on 10/16 (breaks old record of 65 set in 1985) Atlanta: High Maximum Temperature - 91 on 10/4 (ties record of 91 in 1954) High Minimum Temperature - 71 on 10/7 (ties record of 71 in 2017) -  72 on 10/10 (ties record of 72 in 2017) Daily Precipitation Total - 3.42" on 10/10 (breaks old record of 1.59“ set in 1990) Columbus: High Minimum Temperature - 74 on 10/10 (ties record of 74 in 1919) Daily Precipitation Total - 3.26" on 10/10 (breaks old record of 1.11“ set in 1999) Macon: High Maximum Temperature - 92 on 10/16 (breaks old record of 88 set in 2015 and 1971) High Minimum Temperature  - 74 on 10/10 (breaks old record of 72 set in 2017) Daily Precipitation Total - 3.22" on 10/10 (breaks old record of 1.18“ set in 1994)   Yearly Temperatures at DaculaWeather.com  

NorthGeorgiaWX

NorthGeorgiaWX

 

Chilly and Damp for the End of the Work Week

The upcoming 5 days are going to really make you feel like it's fall! Today, sunny and warm! Awesome day to get outside, and probably the best day to do so through Monday. I'll share several images here, temps and temp anomalies for Thu/Fri, and precip through Sunday night. Max Temp Thursday   Thursday Max Temp Anomalies   Max Temps Friday   Friday Max Temp Anomalies - Notice that some of those temps are close to 20 degrees below normal. Looks like a wedge. A wedge is also called Cold Air Damming or CAD.    Precip through Sunday - For most, close to an inch of rain will fall

NorthGeorgiaWX

NorthGeorgiaWX

Winter of 2009-2010

One of the winters that is an analog for the Weatherbell forecast is the winter of 2009-2010. Since you probably don't remember many of the details, I've brought many of them together here for you to read.  My next post will be another analog, 2002-2003. 

The average temperatures for the December 2009 - February 2010 period were among some of the coldest ever across north and central Georgia.  Each of the four climate sites - Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Athens Ben Epps Airport, Columbus Metropolitan  Airport, and Macon/Middle Georgia Regional Airport - saw average temperatures among the ten coldest ever recorded.  The average temperatures for Columbus had the 4th coldest average temperature for the winter season, while Macon tied for the 5th coldest, Atlanta was the eighth coldest and Athens tied for the ninth coldest winter season.   Dec - Feb 2009-2010   Dec 2009 Temp Anomalies   Jan 2010 Temp Anomalies   Feb 2010 Temp Anomalies   DJF 500 mb Anomalies Winter 2009-2010 The total snowfall this season at Atlanta breaks top 5 for total snowfall recorded December through March for the period of record.  As of midnight Wednesday March 3, the total snowfall for the winter season was 5.3 inches which is now the fifth highest since accurate snow records began in 1929. Additionally... the snow on March 2nd marks the third time measurable snow and the tenth time at least a trace of snow or sleet fell at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport this season. In an average winter season Atlanta typically experiences 4 days of measurable snow and 6 days with a trace or more of snow or sleet.   A few of my own pictures...   January 7th, 2010 - Snow On Thursday, January 7th, a cold front pushed across north and central Georgia, with the combination and timing of cold air and moisture bringing wintry precipitation across the area. Light snow began during the late morning hours. Snow fell across the area through the day and into the early hours of Friday January 8th.  The reinforcing cold air behind the front remained across much of the area through the weekend.  North and much of central Georgia's temperatures stayed at or below freezing through Sunday.  The map to the left shows the snowfall amounts across north and central Georgia.
March 2, 2010  Snow An upper level disturbance traversing the western portion of the United States February 28 and March 1, 2010  helped to develop a surface low along the Texas coast on March 1. This surface low pressure system tracked along the Gulf coast and advected moisture ahead of the system into Georgia from both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. By Tuesday, March 2, the surface low moved across southern Georgia and the Florida panhandle  and by that afternoon, had moved into the Atlantic Ocean along the Carolina coast. This system brought both rain and snow to the state. Precipitation started as rain and began moving into western Georgia just before midnight on March 2. During the morning hours on March 2 the precipitation continued moving across the state and changed to snow across north Georgia. The snow proceeded to change back to rain during the afternoon and ended across eastern Georgia late in the evening. Snowfall amounts averaged from 2 to 4 inches across north Georgia. However, higher values were reported across northeast Georgia with reports of 9.0 inches in Union county.   February 12th, 2010 Snow On Friday, February 12th, precipitation associated with a surface low tracking across the Gulf of Mexico and an upper level short wave tracked across much of north and central Georgia. Light snow began over portions of west Georgia around noontime, then spread eastward through the afternoon before tapering off to flurries by mid evening and dissipating by early Saturday morning.  Snow and slush on the roadways froze overnight leading to hazardous driving conditions late Friday night into Saturday morning.  The map to the left shows the snowfall amounts across north and central Georgia.   National Climatic Data Center - Click here for full review of the Winter of 2009-2010   The purpose of this special report is to provide documentation, data analysis, and a preliminary understanding of large-scale climate patterns and their effects on regional weather events. In climatological terms, the Cold Season lasts from October through March. The 2009/2010 Cold Season for North America was historically active and powerful. Extreme fluctuations in temperature and precipitation in the mid-latitudes during this period can be attributed to a wide variety of rapidly progressing weather systems. The persistent systems were influenced by larger scale patterns. The strong warm phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) helped to alleviate moderate to exceptional drought across the contiguous United States. Meanwhile, the record-setting negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation produced record cold temperatures in the Deep South. During the October–March period, the contiguous U.S. experienced its eighth wettest such period, while the average temperature was below average (36th coolest). The anomalously cold air, coupled with copious amounts of moisture produced historical snowfall amounts that bested monthly and seasonal records across the country. While the overall drought footprint was at its lowest in the last decade, the moisture surplus caused flooding in the Upper Midwest and New England. High amplitude flow patterns helped the cold arctic air remain entrenched for days and weeks, devastating mild climate crops. The extreme winter of 1977/1978 was similar, as a moderate warm phase of ENSO coincided with a strong negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation. The effects of large-scale climate patterns are often influential on regional weather events and when they are extreme and historic in nature, their local effects are profound and far reaching.  The snow cover extent for the contiguous U.S. during the 2009/2010 Cold Season was above average for the season as a whole, but there was significant variation from month to month. The snowy season got off to an early start with several storms impacting the U.S. during October. These storms helped produce the largest average snow extent during any October for the contiguous U.S. in the 42 year satellite record, according to Rutger's University Global Snow Lab. Conversely, November was very quiet with much below average snow cover. The following three months were cold and snowy with the extent being much above average for December (all time snowiest), January (6th snowiest), and February (3rd snowiest). During January, snow and freezing temperatures were reported as far south as central Florida. 

NorthGeorgiaWX

NorthGeorgiaWX

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