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Weather on This Date - May 19


NorthGeorgiaWX

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Today in Weather History
for May 19 


May 19, 1780 
The infamous "dark day" in New England tradition. At noon it was nearly as dark as night. Chickens went to roost, and many persons were fearful of divine wrath. The phenomena was caused by forest fires to the west of New England. (David Ludlum) 

May 19, 1955 
Lake Maloya NM received 11.28 inches of rain in 24 hours to establish a state record. (The Weather Channel) 

May 19, 1975 
Thunderstorms produced golf ball size hail and wind gusts to 110 mph in Minnesota, between Fridley and Hugo. Fifty persons were injured. The hail and high winds destroyed fifty mobile homes, and a dozen aircraft, and also destroyed a third of the Brighton Elementary School. (The Weather Channel) 

May 19, 1987 
Thunderstorms in Texas produced thirteen inches of rain northwest of Lavernia. The heavy rain, along with golf ball size hail, destroyed eighty percent of the crops in the area, while high winds toppled trees. Golf ball size hail was also reported south of Dallas and around San Antonio. Up to eight inches of rain drenched Guadelupe County. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data) 

May 19, 1988 
Severe thunderstorms in southwest Texas produced hail as large as tennis balls around Midland, with the hail accumulating up to a foot deep. Showers and thunderstorms in the Middle Atlantic Coast Region produced 3.5 inches of rain near Schuylkill PA. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data) 

May 19, 1989 
Thunderstorms developing ahead of a cold front spawned ten tornadoes from Illinois to Tennessee during the afternoon and night. Snow, wind and cold prevailed in the Northern Plateau Region and the Northern Rockies. Dixie, ID, was blanketed with nine inches of snow, winds gusted to 87 mph at Choteau MT, and the temperature at Crater Lake, OR, dipped to 11 degrees. (Storm Data) (The National Weather Summary) 

May 19, 1990 
Thunderstorms deluged Hot Springs AR with thirteen inches of rain in nine hours resulting in a devastating flood. Two waves of water, four to six feet deep, swept down Central Avenue flooding stores and the famous bathhouses on Bathhouse Row. Water released from Lake Hamilton devastated the area between it and Remmel Dam. The 500 foot Carpenter Dam Bridge across Lake Catherine was completely washed away, as were cabins and mobile homes near the lake, many of which flowed right over the top of Remmel Dam. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data) 

Data courtesy of WeatherForYou

 

 
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    • Good morning! I'm not going to waste any time today, we have a lot to talk about. The confidence of the track of Zeta has increased overnight and it now appears that we may take a significant hit from Zeta right here in north Georgia. The current track for Zeta crosses north Georgia very late Wednesday night into Thursday. As Zeta approaches the coast, it will begin to accelerate to the NE. Because of the relatively fast forward speed, Zeta won't be scrubbing off as much wind as we have seen with our past storms, and instead bringing those winds to north Georgia. Zeta rapidly accelerates and rockets from lower Alabama to Virginia in 12 hours.    Right now NWS Atlanta isn't saying much about the winds in the forecast discussion, but they have mentioned them briefly in the Hazardous Weather Outlook   As the HWO mentions, we are currently under a Flash Flood Watch for Wednesday through Thursday.     Rainfall amounts through 8 am Friday morning from the WPC look like this. Some people could see much higher totals. This looks to have a serious upslope component to it and those east facing ridgelines in the mountains could see higher totals.   But back to the winds.  The next three images show accumulated maximum wind gust, so this is basically a snapshot of the wind gust over time and follows the track of Zeta. The are 10 meter readings or approximately 33 feet, or the recommended "standard" height for anemometer siting.  These winds are significant and you can see that the models are bringing some hurricane force wind gust.    The next three images depict the winds at 925mb or right about 2500 feet. I know that I'm pretty close to that level and many in the mountains are about it, so the next three images are significant for those people.  These    If these come to fruition, we are in for some serious wind damage across north Georgia. The soils are relatively wet and with the additional rain, there could be a significant impact on the trees, and I have a big concern about this. I can assure you that I will start securing all of our deck items today.  This storm could create more damage than Issac did a few years ago if things unfold like they are right now.  The ultimate track of Zeta will determine where those highest winds might pass. Right now I think it would be prudent to make preparations for a high wind event across the northern 1/3 of Georgia. As the day goes on we'll know more and more about Zeta, as we are in the timeframe where almost all computer models are in the range where they have very good accuracy since we're only about 48 hours away from those potential impacts. I'll make updates through the day so please check back. BTW, I got the little issues worked out here with images etc. when you come to this site now, it uses https instead of http, so everything is secure. Because of that fix, the app now allows you to login, or it should. Let me know if it doesn't.  EDIT: Just asked the NWS abut their current thoughts on the winds, this is what they are saying at the moment.  I hope everyone has a great Tuesday!
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