Jump to content

Weather on This Date - May 22


NorthGeorgiaWX

181 views

Picture

Today in Weather History
for May 22 


May 22, 1876 
Denver CO was drenched with 6.53 inches of rain in 24 hours, an all-time record for that location. (The Weather Channel) 

May 22, 1911 
The temperature at Lewiston ME soared to 101 degrees. It was the hottest temperature ever recorded in New England during the month of May. (David Ludlum) 

May 22, 1987 
A powerful tornado virtually wiped the small southwest Texas community of Saragosa off the map. The twister destroyed eighty- five percent of the structures in the town killing thirty persons and injuring 121 others in the town of population 183. The tornado hurled trucks and autos through adobe and wood- frame homes, with some vehicles blown 500 feet. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data) 

May 22, 1988 
Thunderstorms produced severe weather over the Central Gulf Coast States. Tennis ball size hail was reported at Ripley MS. Showers and thunderstorms in southern Missouri produced 3.20 inches of rain at Springfield to easily surpass their rainfall record for the date. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data) 

May 22, 1989 
Unseasonably hot weather continued in southern Texas and parts of the southwestern U.S. Seven cities reported record high temperatures for the date, including El Paso TX with a reading of 100 degrees. Presidio TX was the hot spot in the nation with a high of 111 degrees. (The National Weather Summary) 

May 22, 1990 
Late afternoon and evening thunderstorms developing ahead of a cold front in the north central U.S. produced severe weather from northwestern Kansas to central Minnesota and southeastern North Dakota. There were twenty-nine reports of damaging winds, or dime to golf ball size hail. Strong thunderstorm winds gusted to 69 mph at Alexandria, MN. Showers and thunderstorms over eastern North Carolina soaked Wilmington with 2.91 inches of rain, which established a record for the date. (The National Weather Summary) (Storm Data) 

May 22, 2003

Heavy rain produced flash flooding across parts of northwest Georgia. Over $1.2 million in damages occurred this day, the most occurring in Whitfield County where nearly 5 inches of rain fell in about 3 hours. Dalton schools were closed and several county buses were stranded because of washed out, flooded and closed roads. A mudslide above the Shaw Industries Carpet Plant in Dalton resulted in trees falling into utility cables causing a temporary shutdown of the plant. Mud also inundated 3 cars in a parking lot. (NWS Atlanta)

Data courtesy of WeatherForYou

 

 
Picture
 
 

 
 

 

View the full article

 

0 Comments


Recommended Comments

There are no comments to display.

Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Posts

    • Good morning! I'm not going to waste any time today, we have a lot to talk about. The confidence of the track of Zeta has increased overnight and it now appears that we may take a significant hit from Zeta right here in north Georgia. The current track for Zeta crosses north Georgia very late Wednesday night into Thursday. As Zeta approaches the coast, it will begin to accelerate to the NE. Because of the relatively fast forward speed, Zeta won't be scrubbing off as much wind as we have seen with our past storms, and instead bringing those winds to north Georgia. Zeta rapidly accelerates and rockets from lower Alabama to Virginia in 12 hours.    Right now NWS Atlanta isn't saying much about the winds in the forecast discussion, but they have mentioned them briefly in the Hazardous Weather Outlook   As the HWO mentions, we are currently under a Flash Flood Watch for Wednesday through Thursday.     Rainfall amounts through 8 am Friday morning from the WPC look like this. Some people could see much higher totals. This looks to have a serious upslope component to it and those east facing ridgelines in the mountains could see higher totals.   But back to the winds.  The next three images show accumulated maximum wind gust, so this is basically a snapshot of the wind gust over time and follows the track of Zeta. The are 10 meter readings or approximately 33 feet, or the recommended "standard" height for anemometer siting.  These winds are significant and you can see that the models are bringing some hurricane force wind gust.    The next three images depict the winds at 925mb or right about 2500 feet. I know that I'm pretty close to that level and many in the mountains are there or above, so the next three images are significant for those people.      If these come to fruition, we are in for some serious wind damage across north Georgia. The soils are relatively wet and with the additional rain, there could be a significant impact on the trees, and I have a big concern about this. I can assure you that I will start securing all of our deck items today.  This storm could create more damage than Issac did a few years ago if things unfold like they are right now.  The ultimate track of Zeta will determine where those highest winds might pass. Right now I think it would be prudent to make preparations for a high wind event across the northern 1/3 of Georgia. As the day goes on we'll know more and more about Zeta, as we are in the timeframe where almost all computer models are in the range where they have very good accuracy since we're only about 48 hours away from those potential impacts. I'll make updates through the day so please check back. BTW, I got the little issues worked out here with images etc. when you come to this site now, it uses https instead of http, so everything is secure. Because of that fix, the app now allows you to login, or it should. Let me know if it doesn't.  EDIT: Just asked the NWS abut their current thoughts on the winds, this is what they are saying at the moment.  I hope everyone has a great Tuesday!
    • NAM looks like this right now, but it's at the end of its run. 
    • How does the wind gust potential look with Zeta? I know it's not going to be a very strong storm, but the forward speed looks impressive going from landfall to well past us in under 24 hours. 
×
×
  • Create New...